Yellowstone National Park

Photos from the WFIWC Archives:
 

The photos shown below have been contributed by Mal Furniss, History Committee Co-Chairman. View an introduction to this collection of historical photos, or a bibliography of selected historical articles.

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photo of 4 people looking into the Old Faithful geyser

James C. Evenden took this photo in 1923 on his first entomological visit to Yellowstone National Park. His caption: "Peeking into the machinery of Old Faithful during its hourly rest." (Furniss & Renkin 2003, Figure 1A). Coeur d'Alene FIL photo from WFIWC archives.




photo of a bear with front paws on a truck, looking for food

James C. Evenden took this photo in 1923 on his first entomological visit to Yellowstone National Park. His caption is "Jesse James" on the job. Experience gained over time no longer allows this un-natural behavior of bears and also has resulted in more passive management of forest insects within the park. (Furniss & Renkin 2003, Figure 1B). Coeur d'Alene FIL photo no. 160 from WFIWC archives.




photo of T.Terrell standing next to an airplane

In 1926, Tom T. Terrell joined Jim Evenden's staff at the Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, Forest Insect Lab and conducted the first aerial survey of Yellowstone N.P. in 1930. He is shown here in 1932 beside an open cockpit airplane like that used on his landmark survey that marked the first such use of an aircraft in the northern Rocky Mountains (Furniss & Renkin 2003, Figure 3). Coeur d'Alene FIL photo from WFIWC archives.




photo of 2 people spraying trees from the ground

During 1929-1934, an infestation of western spruce budworm in Cody Canyon, Wyoming, was sprayed heavily with a solution of lead arsenate in an attempt to protect the scenic east entrance to Yellowstone Park. This crew is dousing an infested Douglas-fir. In response to the insistence of local inhabitants, thousands of gallons of spray were applied to trees around seven ranches and along the road leading to the Park (Furniss & Renkin 2003, Figure 5B). Coeur d'Alene FIL photo from WFIWC archives.




photo of lodgepole pines being sprayed with lead arsenate

Spraying lead arsenate on lodgepole pines infested with larvae of needletiers (Argyrotaenia tubulana Freeman) and sawflies (Neodiprion burkei Middleton) along the park highway near West Yellowstone, MT, July 1924. Harry E. Burke studied these insects and supervised spraying during 1925-1927.(Furniss & Renkin 2003, Figure 8). Coeur d'Alene FIL photo no. 263 from WFIWC archives.




photo of a person spraying oil on a tree infested with mountain pine beetle

"Burning-standing" method of mountain pine beetle control. Fuel oil was sprayed upward on the trunk of a standing, infested lodgepole pine after which the oil was ignited to destroy beetle broods in the bark. Bechler Ranger District, Yellowstone National Park, 1931.(Furniss & Renkin 2003, Figure 14). Coeur d'Alene FIL photo from WFIWC archives.






photo of a large US Weather Bureau kite used in an attempt to trap mountain pine beetles

Tom Terrell (kneeling) at winch used to raise a U.S. Weather Bureau kite containing a net (lower left) to 8,000 ft above ground at Big Hole Basin, Montana, during study of mountain pine beetle flight in 1933. A massive outbreak of the beetle was in progress and thought to be headed for Yellowstone N.P. During 29-1/2 hours of trapping, only two bark beetles were caught, and neither was a mountain pine beetle. (Furniss & Renkin 2003, Figure 14). Coeur d'Alene FIL photo no. 768 from WFIWC archives.




photo of DDT application by airplane

Stearman spraying DDT over the western edge of Blacktail Plateau near Lava Creek in Yellowstone N.P. during one of the last spruce budworm control projects in the Park, July 1955. The ensuing controversy over environmental damage done by this insecticide hastened the adoption of a more passive management policy in the 1960's regarding forest insects in the Park (Furniss & Renkin 2003, Figure 17B). Coeur d'Alene FIL photo from WFIWC archives.